Acadia’s CLEAN Center maintains one of the most comprehensive collections of energy and emissions information in the region. It draws on multiple sources which are cross-referenced and updated regularly to ensure analyses are in-depth, accurate and timely. Data on economic impacts and benefits, emission trends, and comparative costs is a powerful tool to advance climate and energy initiatives.

The CLEAN Center presents data in accessible, targeted materials. Acadia Center’s staff engages with a wide range of audiences and issues, so they know what information is needed, and the most effective ways to present it. The CLEAN Center maintains up-to-date data sets on energy usage, fuel prices, weather trends, and many other critical variables. Staff are constantly improving and re-shaping the analyses and work products to meet the latest needs.

Acadia CLEAN Center materials answer questions like: How can we get to 80% emissions reductions by 2050? What are the comparative emissions and economic impacts of importing tar sands derived oil versus cleaner alternatives? How much money and fuel are saved by driving electric vehicles, both now and in the future? What will business as usual energy consumption and costs look like for the state of Rhode Island, with the current policy mix?

Modeling and analysis capabilities include: macroeconomic and econometric modeling, emissions inventory construction, energy and emissions forecasting, statistical analysis, spatial analysis, energy cost/consumption/emissions scenario analysis, and energy system optimization. The team creates visualizations, graphs, reports, trackers, analyses, maps, and more.

Acadia’s CLEAN Center fields requests from other advocates and community groups, media, state and local government, business and industry reps, and more. The organization’s materials have a strong reputation for being fair, credible and effective.

  • Joint Principles on Residential Fixed Charges in New York

    Fixed charges are the flat monthly fees that every customer pays, regardless of the amount of electricity they consume. Starting in the 1990s, New York instituted high fixed charges for residential customers. In the Joint Principles on Residential Fixed Charges in New York, 44 organizations call on New York utility regulators to lower these inefficient and regressive rates. These organizations come from many different perspectives, including low-income and consumer advocates, environmental and clean energy public interest organizations, solar advocates, and clean energy industry groups, and span national organizations as well as community organizations all across New York.

  • Outpacing the Nation: RGGI’s Environmental and Economic Success

    Acadia Center's 2017 RGGI report shows that over its eight and a half years of operation, the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) has helped Northeast and Mid-Atlantic States achieve significant reductions in emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other pollutants from the electric power sector. Over the same period RGGI states’ economies have outpaced the rest of the country, and electricity prices within RGGI have fallen, even as prices in other states have increased.

  • The Offshore Wind Opportunity in Connecticut

    A key component to achieving a decarbonized energy future, offshore wind is now a reality in the Northeast. The Block Island Wind Farm off the coast of Rhode Island is operational, Massachusetts is actively reviewing offshore wind project bids, and New York, Maryland, and New Jersey are all developing their own ambitious programs. In Connecticut, offshore wind offers the state an opportunity to grow its clean energy economy, particularly along the shoreline. With three deep-water ports and a skilled manufacturing sector, Connecticut is well-suited to move forward on offshore wind—all that is needed now is policy action.

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