Acadia’s CLEAN Center maintains one of the most comprehensive collections of energy and emissions information in the region. It draws on multiple sources which are cross-referenced and updated regularly to ensure analyses are in-depth, accurate and timely. Data on economic impacts and benefits, emission trends, and comparative costs is a powerful tool to advance climate and energy initiatives.

The CLEAN Center presents data in accessible, targeted materials. Acadia Center’s staff engages with a wide range of audiences and issues, so they know what information is needed, and the most effective ways to present it. The CLEAN Center maintains up-to-date data sets on energy usage, fuel prices, weather trends, and many other critical variables. Staff are constantly improving and re-shaping the analyses and work products to meet the latest needs.

Acadia CLEAN Center materials answer questions like: How can we get to 80% emissions reductions by 2050? What are the comparative emissions and economic impacts of importing tar sands derived oil versus cleaner alternatives? How much money and fuel are saved by driving electric vehicles, both now and in the future? What will business as usual energy consumption and costs look like for the state of Rhode Island, with the current policy mix?

Modeling and analysis capabilities include: macroeconomic and econometric modeling, emissions inventory construction, energy and emissions forecasting, statistical analysis, spatial analysis, energy cost/consumption/emissions scenario analysis, and energy system optimization. The team creates visualizations, graphs, reports, trackers, analyses, maps, and more.

Acadia’s CLEAN Center fields requests from other advocates and community groups, media, state and local government, business and industry reps, and more. The organization’s materials have a strong reputation for being fair, credible and effective.

  • Local_Energy_Investment_and_Infrastructure_Modernization - Coalition One Pager

    Local Energy Investment and Infrastructure Modernization

    In its proposal for local energy investment and infrastructure modernization, Acadia Center presents concepts for legislation to modernize Massachusetts' distribution system, promote local energy resources as alternatives to infrastructure, cap residential fixed charges, and improve incentives through time-of-use rates. Local Energy Investment and Infrastructure Modernization was proposed with support of a broad-based coalition as HD 1497 (Rep. Benson) -- SD 1371 (Sen. Pacheco): https://malegislature.gov/Bills/190/SD1371.

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    EnergyVision 2030 One-Page Preview

    Advances in energy technology and declining clean energy costs offer an historic opportunity to build a truly clean, low carbon, and consumer friendly energy future that is also more reliable and resilient. These changes are profound—and a large disconnect exists between how we currently see and interact with the energy system and what a low-emission future could look like. Acadia Center is preparing EnergyVision 2030 to help fill this information and “vision” gap by presenting a detailed picture of what the energy system would look like in 2030 on a pathway to a clean energy future in 2050. This picture will show audiences in New England and New York a changed but recognizable system and help make today’s policy and infrastructure decisions with much better context and thus comfort.

  • pages-from-acadia-center-consumer-friendly-rate-design-for-a-clean-energy-future-near-term-reforms

    Sustainable Rate Design: Near-Term Consumer-Friendly Reforms for a Clean Energy Future

    Electricity bills for residential customers in many states often combine a low fixed monthly charge with flat rates for electricity consumed and delivered charged on a per-kilowatt hour basis. Traditionally, this structure has worked for utilities by providing a simple mechanism to recover enough revenue to build, maintain, and operate the grid. This existing rate design for residential customers has many positive features, but is a blunt and inefficient instrument in many respects. Changes in electricity rate design can help address a number of different issues. In these comments, Acadia Center proposes a following five-point plan to achieve the above described objectives and principles for residential customers.

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