Acadia’s CLEAN Center maintains one of the most comprehensive collections of energy and emissions information in the region. It draws on multiple sources which are cross-referenced and updated regularly to ensure analyses are in-depth, accurate and timely. Data on economic impacts and benefits, emission trends, and comparative costs is a powerful tool to advance climate and energy initiatives.

The CLEAN Center presents data in accessible, targeted materials. Acadia Center’s staff engages with a wide range of audiences and issues, so they know what information is needed, and the most effective ways to present it. The CLEAN Center maintains up-to-date data sets on energy usage, fuel prices, weather trends, and many other critical variables. Staff are constantly improving and re-shaping the analyses and work products to meet the latest needs.

Acadia CLEAN Center materials answer questions like: How can we get to 80% emissions reductions by 2050? What are the comparative emissions and economic impacts of importing tar sands derived oil versus cleaner alternatives? How much money and fuel are saved by driving electric vehicles, both now and in the future? What will business as usual energy consumption and costs look like for the state of Rhode Island, with the current policy mix?

Modeling and analysis capabilities include: macroeconomic and econometric modeling, emissions inventory construction, energy and emissions forecasting, statistical analysis, spatial analysis, energy cost/consumption/emissions scenario analysis, and energy system optimization. The team creates visualizations, graphs, reports, trackers, analyses, maps, and more.

Acadia’s CLEAN Center fields requests from other advocates and community groups, media, state and local government, business and industry reps, and more. The organization’s materials have a strong reputation for being fair, credible and effective.

  • RGGI on the World Stage

    Following the Trump Administration’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement, cities, states and regions will increasingly need to lead on climate. The nine states participating in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) have demonstrated a will to forge ahead in the absence of federal action in the past, and their leadership will make a substantial impact on the global fight against climate change; together, these states have a GDP of $2.8 trillion, representing the world’s 6th largest economy. Fortunately, the list of states taking action on climate is growing.

  • Distributed System Implementation Plans in New York: Summary and Analysis

    States throughout the Northeast are considering how to transition from an energy grid that delivers power one-way, from fossil fuel power generators to customers, to a modern, dynamic, and flexible energy system that is centered around our homes and businesses. Massachusetts utilities have presented plans for updating the electric grid in their Grid Modernization Plans, which are currently under consideration at the Commonwealth’s Department of Public Utilities. Rhode Island’s Power Sector Transformation Initiative is currently seeking feedback on Distribution System Planning for a modern grid. In response to New York’s Reforming the Energy Vision, the state’s electric utilities have developed Distribution System Implementation Plans. Acadia Center has analyzed and summarized the New York experience here.

  • Carbon Pricing in Massachusetts and the Northeast Region

    Massachusetts legislators are working to pass the nation's first carbon pricing legislation, a step that would help cement the state's reputation as a leader on smart climate action. Similar efforts are underway throughout the region, as carbon pricing legislation has also been introduced in Connecticut, New York, Rhode Island, and Vermont. With the economic heft of this region, carbon pricing legislation would constitute a substantial step towards a low-carbon future.

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