Energy efficiency is a cornerstone of good state and regional energy policy. Investments in efficient equipment like lighting, appliances, and industrial motors reduce consumer energy bills and also reduce the need for expensive energy infrastructure like transmission lines and power plants. Acadia Center works to ensure that programs are effective, well-funded and reach a wide spectrum of customers with the deepest possible energy and cost savings for each participant.

Efficiency investments in leading states have deferred the need for nearly half a billion dollars in new energy infrastructure projects, produced $19.5 billion in economic benefits, cut electric use by 124,000 GWh, and avoided 51.3 million metric tons of CO2 pollution. Acadia Center’s macroeconomic studies show that efficiency investments create jobs, keep energy dollars at home, and help to grow local economies.

The challenge is to build from this strong foundation to reach for even greater savings and aid the transformation to a cleaner electric grid. These goals can be achieved by maximizing efficiency investments that are available and cost effective and focusing on ways efficiency can minimize infrastructure investments and integrate renewables. Acadia Center helped create the policies that have led states to top-in-the-nation investments in energy efficiency. Acadia Center pioneered the stakeholder council model as a means of ensuring consistent implementation, evaluation and diverse representation in the energy efficiency procurement process. Staff members currently hold appointed seats on these councils in Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island. Acadia Center works with businesses, utilities, regulators and others to make sure that programs meet their goals and reach all customers.

  • The Offshore Wind Opportunity in Connecticut

    A key component to achieving a decarbonized energy future, offshore wind is now a reality in the Northeast. The Block Island Wind Farm off the coast of Rhode Island is operational, Massachusetts is actively reviewing offshore wind project bids, and New York, Maryland, and New Jersey are all developing their own ambitious programs. In Connecticut, offshore wind offers the state an opportunity to grow its clean energy economy, particularly along the shoreline. With three deep-water ports and a skilled manufacturing sector, Connecticut is well-suited to move forward on offshore wind—all that is needed now is policy action.

  • Addendum Comments on Scope of Millstone Study in Response to Executive Order No. 59

    Connecticut’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection and Public Utilities Regulatory Authority requested addendum comments following the August 17, 2017 public hearing on the scope of their study of the Millstone Power Station. Based on the conversation and testimony presented at the public hearing, Acadia Center advocates that the study must include greater modeling transparency, consider the most recent data available, and increase the modeling timeframe to fully understand the long-term impacts of closure on the state’s Global Warming Solutions Act.

  • Joint Letter to Connecticut’s Public Utilities Regulatory Authority Regarding Docket 17-01-12

    Seventeen organizations signed a letter to encourage the Connecticut Public Utilities Regulatory Authority to develop a generic formula for the residential fixed charge that remains consistent with the outcome of the recent United Illuminating electric rate case---in which the residential fixed charge was cut by 45%---and that also does not deviate from the limited scope of eligible costs defined in Connecticut’s 2015 residential fixed charge statute. The letter outlines how lowering fixed charges will benefit a majority of residential customers, particularly low-income and low-usage customers.

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