The traditional utility and power grid model of a one-way power flow from central generating stations to consumers is rapidly giving way to an exciting, consumer-friendly energy future. The system can be more cost-effective, cleaner, offer greater consumer control over energy costs and help clear the pathway to very low carbon emissions.

In Acadia Center’s vision of a modern grid, homes and businesses become the centerpiece of the energy system. Consumers will have greater control over energy use through technologies such as rooftop solar water heating and photovoltaic systems, advanced meters that help consumers control and monitor power usage, and technologies such as smart appliances and heat pumps. Community energy systems- local wind power, solar arrays, and combined heat and power- will also play an important role in the modern power grid. UtilityVision, an Acadia Center publication, presents this comprehensive vision with illustrations and recommendations. Acadia Center is also participating in grid modernization dockets and related state and regional proceedings and forums.

Technological advancement in the energy arena is moving so quickly that the market is ahead of the regulatory structure governing utilities. Today’s grid planning and investment policies were developed in an earlier era, when large fossil-fueled power plants were constructed to energize population centers. Longstanding policies skew decisions in favor of legacy power grid investments over newer, often less expensive and more advanced solutions. The rules need to change so that viable, often lower-cost, alternatives to transmission and distribution infrastructure projects are fully considered. New regulations should also reflect the appropriate role of the utility in an increasingly decentralized system.

Acadia Center is working to update policy models so they align utilities’ financial incentives with the public’s clean energy, carbon reduction, and economic goals.

 

  • Acadia Center Testimony on Solar Siting in Rhode Island (H5789)

    In Rhode Island, siting challenges that have arisen in the past few years show that the state can’t accelerate its clean energy transition without a siting plan. In a landscape patchworked with forest, farmland, and open space, policies and incentives must prioritize solar projects in areas with compatible land uses. H5789 is a solar siting bill introduced in 2019 with the aim of address these challenges. Read on to see Acadia Center's testimony on House Bill 5789.

  • Comments to Rhode Island CRMC on Offshore Wind

    Acadia Center's comments submitted as testimony to Rhode Island's Coastal Resources Management Council in its decision on the development of Vineyard Wind's offshore wind farm for Massachusetts.

  • Letter on Solar Policy to the Connecticut Energy and Technology Committee

    Connecticut organizations and businesses submitted this letter to the Energy and Technology Committee of the Connecticut Legislature, calling for a pause to implementation of harmful solar policies and a return to net metering and other policies that were mistakenly removed through a bill last session.

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