• Initiatives

  • Regions

  • Document Type

  • Year

Acadia Center Evaluation of 2019-2021 MA Three-Year Energy Efficiency Plan and EEAC Resolution

On October 30, 2018, the Massachusetts Energy Efficiency Advisory Council (EEAC) unanimously approved a resolution supporting the utility program administrators’ proposed Three-Year Plan for 2019-2021. In its role as the environmental representative on the EEAC, Acadia Center successfully represented stakeholder priorities and pushed for the 2019-2021 Plan to innovate, better use technology, help customers switch from polluting oil to clean, efficient heat pumps, and cut electric and gas peak demand in summer and winter. Now the Plan moves to the Department of Public Utilities (DPU) for consideration and approval by the end of January 2019.

Acadia Center Evaluation of the Sept. 14 Draft of the 2019-2021 MA Three-Year Energy Efficiency Plan

In Massachusetts, energy efficiency is delivered primarily through utility-run programs, overseen by the Department of Public Utilities with the assistance of a stakeholder council called the Energy Efficiency Advisory Council (EEAC), on which Acadia Center holds the environmental representative seat.

Throughout 2018, the EEAC, efficiency program administrators (PAs), and other stakeholders have been engaged in a process to develop a 3-year plan for 2019-2021. This is Acadia Center’s analysis of the September 14th Revised Draft submitted by the PAs. This document discusses key shortcomings that must be addressed in advance of the October vote. Acadia Center is hopeful that these improvements will be reflected in the final plan.

Transportation Climate Policy in Rhode Island

Rhode Island’s transportation system—its network of highways, trains, public transit, airports, ports, and walking and biking corridors—is vital to the state’s economy. It facilitates the movement of goods and connects people to jobs, shopping, recreation, and other services. However, the system needs critical improvements to address major challenges and better serve the state’s communities and businesses.

Acadia Center Summary of 2018 Clean Energy Legislation in MA Page 1

Acadia Center Summary of 2018 Clean Energy Legislation in MA

On July 31, 2018, the Massachusetts House and Senate passed H.4857, An Act to Advance Clean Energy. On August 9, 2018, Governor Baker signed this bill into law, now Chapter 227 of the Acts of 2018. This documents summarizes the legislation and key implications.

Assessing New York’s Proposed ‘New Efficiency’ Initiative

In 2018, New York released a new energy efficiency strategy that centers on a 2025 energy savings target of 185 trillion British thermal units. Acadia Center analyzed this new target and its underlying initiatives to determine whether it would maximize energy efficiency's benefits for New York. Based on that analysis, Acadia Center offers four recommendations for strengthening the plan.

Grid Modernization and Utility Reform Policy Options

Acadia Center’s UtilityVision (2015) confronts several categories of reforms needed to advance a consumer and environmentally-friendly energy grid. These reforms make up a comprehensive regulatory framework that integrates how parts of the new energy system can work to put the consumer at the center of the modern grid. This document contains new proposals and recommendations to advance changes in each category.

Cover page

ACES Letter to Massachusetts House Leadership

The Northeast Clean Energy Council (NECEC) and the Acadia Center co-­chair the Alliance for Clean Energy Solutions (ACES), a “coalition of coalitions” comprising business groups, clean energy companies, environmental organizations, and health and consumer representatives dedicated to advancing clean energy for Massachusetts. This coalition letter recommends favorable action on four bills before the close of the Massachusetts legislative session in 2018.

Northeast Transportation Innovation – Engaging Community Allies for a Clean, Equitable Transportation Future

Maine’s roads, highways, and bridges are vital to the state’s well-being and prosperity, and persistent budget shortfalls—$68 million annually—have real economic consequences. Our outdated transportation system is also responsible for the largest share of greenhouse gas emissions, and presents dangerous threats to our climate and public health. Proposals to reform transportation funding at the state level have failed every year since 2009, but regional collaboration offers Maine a path to meet these challenges and achieve a clean, modern transportation system that meets community needs, reduces air pollution, and enhances economic opportunity.

Joint Letter from 25 Organizations in Support of Amendment 10 to S.2545

This joint letter supports Amendment 10 to S.2545 (An Act to promote a clean energy future). Adoption and promotion of optional on-peak/off-peak rates, as required by the amendment, is an important way of providing improved incentives for ratepayers to manage peak demand through a wide variety of methods. These include management of energy usage, advanced energy storage, smarter energy efficiency investment, local clean energy generation such as solar, and electric vehicle charging at off-peak times.

Acadia Center Letter to CT GC3 Supporting Regional Transportation Climate Policy

In the 2018 legislative session, the CT General Assembly enacted a mandate for the state to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 45% by 2030 – aligned with Acadia Center’s EnergyVision 2030 analysis. The Governor’s Council on Climate Change (GC3) is now considering policy mechanisms to reach this target. In advance of their June meeting, Acadia Center sent a letter to the GC3 highlighting the enormous benefits a regional transportation climate policy would have for Connecticut.

EnergyVision 2030 Progress Reports
Clean Transportation in Rhode Island