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RGGI Auction Prices Rebound in Response to Proposed Changes

BOSTON — Prices increased in the first Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) auction since the participating states proposed a set of changes to the program. This is an initial indication that the market expects the program to be stronger in the future. All 14,371,585 available allowances were sold at a clearing price of $4.35, generating $62,516,395 in revenue for reinvestment. This brings the program’s total revenue to $2.78 billion—most of which has been used to fund energy efficiency and other consumer benefit programs. The Auction 37 clearing price is 72% higher than the previous auction and 4% lower than the clearing price from one year ago. This marks an end to the steady decline in auction clearing prices that began in early 2016.

The key changes announced by the states include:

 

“We applaud the RGGI states for working together to improve the program, and the Auction 37 results show that these changes should make RGGI stronger,” said Acadia Center President Daniel Sosland. “After nearly two years of negotiations, the states have put RGGI on a course for long-term success.”

“Proposed policy changes have driven prices upward in this auction, but implementing RGGI reforms is the only way to ensure that prices won’t dive again,” said Jordan Stutt, Policy Analyst with Acadia Center. “Emissions continue to fall rapidly—each of the first two quarters in 2017 resulted in record low quarterly emissions—and even the new cap may not decline quickly enough to keep up with decarbonization in the electric sector. Fortunately, the new addition of an Emissions Containment Reserve should help the states reduce emissions further, at low costs to consumers.”

“The increase in allowance prices is a testament to the leadership of the RGGI states,” said Peter Shattuck, Director of Acadia Center’s Clean Energy Initiative. “By following through on proposed reforms, the nine RGGI states can demonstrate the power of bipartisan action to address climate change.”

Information on RGGI’s performance to date can be found in Acadia Center’s latest RGGI Status Report:

 

Additional information on the benefits of RGGI can be found at https://www.cleanenergyeconomy.us/

RGGI Overview:
The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) is the first mandatory, market-based effort in the United States to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Nine northeastern and mid-Atlantic states reduce CO2 emissions by setting an overall limit on emissions “allowances,” which permit power plants to dispose of CO2 in the atmosphere. States sell allowances through auctions and invest proceeds in consumer benefit programs: energy efficiency, renewable energy, and other programs.

The official RGGI web site is: www.rggi.org


Media Contacts:

Jordan Stutt, Policy Analyst, Clean Energy Initiative
jstutt@acadiacenter.org, 617-742-0054 x105

Peter Shattuck, Director, Clean Energy Initiative
pshattuck@acadiacenter.org, 617-742-0054 x103

EnergyVision 2030: What the numbers tell us about how to achieve a clean energy system

What impact will current efforts to expand clean energy markets in the Northeast have over time? Where can we do more to advance these markets? What specific increases in clean energy are needed to adequately reduce carbon pollution and meet targets for deep reductions in climate pollution? What does the data show about claims that more natural gas pipeline capacity is needed?

A few years ago, Acadia Center released a framework entitled EnergyVision, which shows that a clean energy future can be achieved in the Northeast by drawing on the benefits of using clean energy to heat our homes, transport us, and generate clean power. Many studies have shown that a clean energy future will improve public health, increase consumer choice, and spur economic growth by keeping consumer energy dollars in the region. States have started to move towards the future put forward in our EnergyVision framework supporting key clean energy technologies like rooftop solar, electric vehicles, and wind, and increasing investments in energy efficiency and upgrades to the grid.

But other voices have tried to slow or even block progress toward a clean energy future. Claims that the region needs more natural gas capacity continue to be made, most recently by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, and states are not uniformly moving forward in all areas of clean energy development. Efforts to reform the power grid vary from state to state, and the data needed to identify what our energy system could look like in a few years and what contribution clean energy can make has not been gathered.

To fill these important information gaps and help answer these questions, Acadia Center undertook a comprehensive analysis of the Northeast’s energy system. Using a data based approach, we looked at where current state and regional efforts to expand clean energy stand and what emissions reductions and growth in markets for clean energy technologies those efforts will produce. We then examined what expansions in clean energy are needed to attain state goals to reduce climate pollution. The result is EnergyVision 2030, an analysis of the energy system that provides a clear pathway towards a clean energy future that empowers consumers in the Northeast.

EnergyVision 2030 demonstrates that the Northeast region can be on track to a clean energy system using technologies that are available now. In the last several years, clean technologies have advanced rapidly, and they offer states an unprecedented opportunity to transform the way energy is produced and used. For example:

 

And the list goes on.

To determine what growth in key clean energy technologies is needed, Acadia Center used a well-respected model1 to analyze the energy system as it might look in the year 2030 under different conditions. First, EnergyVision 2030 shows what the energy system would look like under current trends, and then if policies were put in place to expand markets for newer technologies more quickly—at rates leading states are already achieving.

With this approach, EnergyVision 2030 finds that the first generation of climate and energy policies has successfully built a foundation for progress. Energy efficiency, renewable portfolio standards, and the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) have all contributed to declining emissions since the early 2000s.

To be on track to meet state targets for emissions reductions the region needs to achieve a 45% emissions reduction by 2030.2 We used this 45% reduction as a target to develop our “Primary Scenario,” which features individual targets for clean energy technologies that together would reduce emissions 45%. We also modeled what it would take to get to a 50% reduction, in our “Accelerated Scenario.”

Policy changes drive both of these scenarios, which would see lagging states catch up to leaders like Massachusetts in energy efficiency and other areas, expand and extend renewable portfolio standards as New York has recently done, and grow markets for newer clean energy technologies like electric vehicles and cold climate heat pumps. In other words, if all states did what leading states are doing in each area—if they expanded building heat pumps like Maine, electric vehicles and solar like Vermont, energy efficiency like Massachusetts and Rhode Island, and utility reform like New York—the Northeast would achieve its emissions goals.

The table below shows how much selected clean energy technologies will expand by 2030 under current trends and in the Primary and Accelerated Scenarios.

To foster these clean energy markets, states can redouble their efforts and create a second generation of clean energy policies building on their initial success. The following policy recommendations will help make this possible. A more complete list is available at 2030.acadiacenter.org.

Clean Energy:

 

Electric Vehicles:

 

Lower-Cost Heating:

 

Electric Grid:

 

EnergyVision 2030 combines detailed data analysis and policy recommendations to provide a tool for policymakers, advocates, and other stakeholders to demonstrate both why state-level policy changes are needed and what we can do to make those changes happen, putting us on the path to a clean energy system. As with the first generation of clean energy policies, results can take significant time to accumulate, so action is needed now to ensure the region is ready to meet 2030 goals. EnergyVision 2030 gives us the targets and tools we need to begin working toward those policy changes today.

EnergyVision 2030 is available as an interactive website and in printable formats at 2030.acadiacenter.org.

 

1 Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) system from Stockholm Environment Institute
2 45% emissions reduction from 1990 levels