New Jersey looks to rejoin RGGI to tackle greenhouse gas emissions

But Jordan Stutt, carbon programs director at Acadia Center, a clean-energy research and advocacy organization with offices throughout the northeastern United States, said those fears are unfounded.

“The doomsday concerns about electricity prices and competitiveness in the region have not come true,” he said.

Emissions from power plants have dropped 51 percent from 2008, a year before the program started, to 2017, he said. Electricity prices in the region have fallen nearly 6 percent, while they have increased by nearly 9 percent in the rest of the country.

Read the full article from WHYY here.

EPA Relaxes Tough Fuel-Economy Standards for Cars, Light Trucks

“Clean car standards protect all Americans from unnecessarily high fuel costs and from pollution that is dangerous to public health,’’ said Daniel Sosland, president of the Acadia Center, an advocacy group for a clean-energy future. “Rolling back these standards will damage the country’s economy and its competitive position, contrary to erroneous assertions by EPA.’’

Read the full article from NJ Spotlight here.

Chris Christie Has Plenty to Be Embarrassed About, But This One Really Matters

Contrary to what Christie said in 2011, New Jersey has lost money as a result of exiting RGGI. The state lost out on $130 million in proceeds from auctions where RGGI sells emissions permits and could miss out on another $359 million by the end of 2020 if it doesn’t rejoin, according to estimates by the Acadia Center think tank. If the sum of that money were invested in energy efficiency programs, as RGGI is designed to facilitate, New Jersey would save 15.3 million megawatt hours of electricity, more than all the power produced by the state’s coal-fired plants from 2010 to 2012.

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The nine remaining states are deciding between three different options to ramp up the rate at which RGGI reduces emissions. But the states are split between those who want the most ambitious target, such as New York and Massachusetts, and those that want the more modest choice, including Maine and New Hampshire. The difference in cost between the most and least ambitious targets comes out to less than one-tenth of one penny more per kilowatt hour of electricity over the current standard, yet the impact would be huge. Choosing the most aggressive reduction rate would avoid 99 million short tons of carbon dioxide emissions, according to the Acadia Center.

Read the full article from Mother Jones here.

NJ Record: The price New Jersey pays by turning its back on RGGI

NEW JERSEY is missing out by sitting on the sidelines of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative. The state should be a player, not a spectator, in this game that brings so many benefits to the nine states that are already part of the team. A new analysis by our organization (“New Jersey and RGGI: Potential Benefits of Renewed Participation”) shows that by refusing to participate in RGGI, New Jersey is missing out on substantial environmental and economic benefits.