AWA blue leaf

An Ode to Docket 4600

As told through a series of haiku: I drove to Warwick In a blue electric car The chargers were full   Those in the know, know Rhode Island utilities Governed in Warwick   Fifty-four miles left Should be plenty to get home I am risk averse   Endure long meeting With many energy geeks Time-based rates for cars   Leafs swap spots at lunch Brain can’t take much more rate talk Level 2 charging   Start up in silence I pause a moment, and breathe Rate case up ahead  

Connecticut Environmentalists Urge Grass-Roots Campaign To Block Trump’s Pick for EPA

Activist groups represented at Monday’s event included Environment Connecticut, the Sierra Club, the Connecticut Audubon Society, Citizens Campaign for the Environment and the energy watchdog group Acadia Center. William Dornbos, Connecticut director for the Acadia Center, said Pruitt as EPA head would “have a real impact on Connecticut” by restricting access to key air and water pollution records. “Connecticut could lose fundamental resources even without a law being passed,” Dornbos said. Read the full article from the Hartford Courant here.

Massachusetts looks to make winter sunsets later

While potential energy savings are disputed, panelist Peter Shattuck said after Congress in 2005 extended daylight saving time by several weeks, energy consumption during that additional period decreased by 0.5 percent. “If people don’t have to turn on the lights as early, they use less electricity,” said Shattuck, Massachusetts director for the Acadia Center, an energy and environmental advocacy group. Read the full article from the Portland Press Herald here.

Massachusetts weighs doing away with winter time shift

While potential energy savings are disputed, panelist Peter Shattuck said after Congress in 2005 extended daylight saving time by several weeks, energy consumption during that additional period decreased by 0.5 percent. “If people don’t have to turn on the lights as early, they use less electricity,” said Shattuck, Massachusetts director for the Acadia Center, an energy and environmental advocacy group. Read the full article from the Associated Press (reprinted in several local papers) here.

Now Beacon Hill may mess with time

Peter Shattuck, Massachusetts director of the Acadia Center, an environmental advocacy group, said the federal government experimented with shifting time patterns in the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The law extended daylight savings time by four weeks – three extra weeks in the spring and one week in the fall. He said a report on the experiment indicated the nation as a whole shaved electricity consumption by .5 percent and by .7 percent in New England. “That’s a pretty big impact,” said Shattuck, noting that energy savings resulted primarily because people use more energy at night than they do in
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Massachusetts Legislature Passes Bill to Advance Electric Vehicles

BOSTON – Last night, the Massachusetts legislature passed a bill to support electric vehicles (EVs), helping to advance the Commonwealth’s goals of reducing climate pollution and promoting clean energy. Daniel Sosland, President of Acadia Center, said, “Vehicle electrification and moving away from transportation that runs on dirty oil is crucial to attaining an energy future that offers consumers cleaner choices. Acadia Center is very pleased that the Massachusetts legislature has moved this bill forward and would like to thank leadership in the House and Senate as well as the original bill sponsors who have worked so hard to get this done.”
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Cap and trade today for a better tomorrow

According to Acadia Center, from 2008 to 2015 Co2 emissions dropped 30 percent in RGGI states compared to 14 percent in the rest of the country, excluding California, which has its own cap and trade program. During the same period, economic growth totaled 24.9 percent in RGGI states, compared to 21.3 percent in other states. According to a 2015 study, Co2 emissions would be 24 percent higher in RGGI states without the program. In addition, the auction proceeds have generated over $2.58 billion used to support investments in energy efficiency, renewables, greenhouse gas abatement and direct bill assistance. These reinvestments
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Can New England Steal California’s Storage Thunder?

Clean energy rivals New England and California are racing toward a new prize: leadership on energy storage. Both coasts have been leaders on energy efficiency, renewables deployment, and electric vehicles (EVs), and storage is the logical next step to improve system efficiency and back up intermittent wind and solar as they are increasingly adopted. The benefits of storage are clear and increasingly well-recognized. Storage deployed at scale will serve the same purpose as warehouses and refrigerators in our food system by rationalizing an energy grid that is massively overbuilt to match supply and demand every second of every day. This
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RI Public Utilities Commission Votes for Cost-Saving Energy Efficiency Plan

PROVIDENCE, RI – On December 20, 2016 the Rhode Island Public Utilities Commission unanimously approved the 2017 Energy Efficiency and System Reliability Plans for Rhode Island in order to help save consumers money on their utility bills and boost Rhode Island’s economy. This plan was developed collaboratively by key stakeholders representing a wide range of consumer interests, including the Division of Public Utilities and Carriers, the Office of Energy Resources, the Energy Efficiency and Resource Management Council, National Grid, Acadia Center, People’s Power and Light, and Emerald Cities Rhode Island. In 2006, Rhode Island adopted a strategic and economic approach
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CT works on a new energy strategy as old one misses the mark

Acadia Center, a Northeast-based environmental advocacy group that was among critics of the natural gas emphasis in the 2013 CES, discovered a math error in DEEP’s calculation of greenhouse gas emissions in 2013. Instead of being at, or even just below, the 2020 emissions cap dictated by the state’s Global Warming Solutions Act – which is where emissions were in 2012 – they were heading back up. DEEP has since revised its calculation. Acadia’s calculation, based on publicly available data, showed more. “We found an increase of 7.5 percent from 2012 to 2015,” said Bill Dornbos, who heads Acadia’s Connecticut
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