Other assessments of energy efficiency programs show large direct savings to consumers and growth in energy service jobs. By looking at the broader, macroeconomic impacts of those savings, Acadia Center’s modeling study shows that the energy savings generated by efficiency programs frees up money for new spending (in the residential sector) and promotes increased competitiveness and output among businesses and industry. This translates into significant economic growth and job creation potential.

  • Direct Sales of Electric Vehicles in Connecticut

    Connecticut is debating whether to allow the direct sales of electric vehicles (EVs) by manufacturers, but concerns have been raised about potential impacts to employment at existing car dealerships. Acadia Center examined auto dealer employment statistics for nearby states that allow direct sales, and the results indicate that there has been no negative impact on this industry’s job levels or trends.

  • Strengthening RGGI to Improve Public Health

    As participating states weigh the future of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), impacts on public health should be considered. The program’s success in reducing CO2 emissions to date has also led to avoided emissions of harmful co-pollutants, resulting in cleaner air and healthier people. Acadia Center analysis shows that the RGGI states can achieve billions of dollars in additional avoided health impacts by establishing an ambitious cap through 2030.

  • EnergyVision 2030

    Clean energy technologies offer an historic opportunity to build an energy future that produces large consumer, economic, and climate benefits. EnergyVision 2030 shows how, by redoubling existing efforts in four key areas, New York and the six New England states can accelerate this transition and achieve a modern, low-emissions energy future. Read and download the Overview Summary, Companion Briefs, and Technical Appendix below.

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