Envisioning a clear pathway towards meeting long term greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction targets of 80% by 2050 has been a difficult and elusive task.  Yet, an exciting convergence of technology advances and success in reducing carbon emissions from electricity generation points towards viable solutions that can be implemented now to be on the right path.  It may seem counterintuitive, but the key is to rely more on decarbonized electricity to power transportation and buildings. Consider this hypothetical: if all gasoline powered cars on the road and all buildings heating with fossil fuels immediately switched to modern electric technologies like electric vehicles and high efficiency cold weather heat pumps, GHG emissions from these sources in the Northeast would be cut in half.  With further efforts to transition electricity generation to renewable resources, emissions would continue to fall.  Dramatic changes to our power grid, more decentralized and community energy approaches and redoubled efforts to maximize energy efficiency are needed to make this vision real.

  • AcadiaCenter_Chart_CTResFixedChargeScenarios

    CT Fixed Electric Charge Impact Analysis May 2015

    New Analysis Shows that Capping the Fixed Electric Charge at $10 Will Lower the Majority of Monthly Bills for Eversource Energy’s Residential Customers

  • Eversource CT Residential Fixed Charge Public Materials and Rate Case Testimony

    Eversource CT Residential Fixed Charge Public Materials and Rate Case Testimony

    Information provided by Eversource Energy. Rate case testimony from September 2014. Email and Handout to legislators regarding proposed $10 fixed charge cap before the Senate of the CT General Assembly in May 2015. See also Acadia Center analysis (link below)

  • Escalating New England Transmission Costs and the Need for Policy Reforms

    Escalating New England Transmission Costs and the Need for Policy Reforms

    Transmission policy should coordinate with the advances states are making in furthering efficiency and demand side energy solutions. It should incorporate efforts to help consumers use energy more efficiently, embrace the exciting potential offered by new energy technologies and the need to increase our reliance on clean, renewable power and other distributed resources. The grid of the past – and the outdated process used to determine new investments – must change if we are to have a system that can take the northeast into a competitive economic future and a clean, low carbon energy era.

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