• Acadia Center Summary of NY Party Proposals Regarding Net Metering 07062016

    Technical Summary of Proposals Regarding Net Metering in New York

    This document summarizes the proposals and key concepts for valuing distributed energy resources (DER) submitted by twenty-five parties and groups of parties in Case 15-E-0751, initiated by the New York Public Service Commission (NY PSC). In April 2014, the NY PSC announced the beginning of a set of ambitious regulatory proceedings called Reforming the Energy Vision (“REV”) to comprehensively examine the State’s energy policies and regulatory frameworks. Six policy objectives were set for this proceeding: enhanced customer knowledge and tools that will support effective management of their total energy bill; market animation and leverage of ratepayer contributions; system wide efficiency; fuel and resource diversity; system reliability and resiliency; and reduction of carbon emissions. Case 15-E-0751 was initiated to develop an “interim methodology” for valuing DER through electricity rates as well as a longer term process for establishing a full value of DER.

  • Pages from Charge Without a Cause - Final - 7-18-16 (002)

    Charge Without a Cause

    The paper ‘Charge Without a Cause?’ was authored by Paul Chernick with Resource Insight in Massachusetts; John T. Colgan, a former Commissioner at the Illinois Commerce Commission; Rick Gilliam with Vote Solar in Colorado; Douglas Jester with 5 Lakes Energy in Michigan; and Mark LeBel with Acadia Center in Massachusetts. As the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) prepares to hold its 2016 Summer Meetings, this paper assesses an approach to electricity rate design now being proposed by some utilities around the country in response to a changing energy landscape — imposing “demand charges” on residents and small businesses in addition to the large commercial and industrial customers where these types of charges have typically applied.

  • AC_transmissionmemo_spreads_finalforweb_Page_1

    The Hidden Costs of Energy: Overpaying for an Outdated System

    The planning and investment policies that govern our power grid were developed in an earlier era, when large fossil-fueled power plants were constructed to energize population centers. Longstanding policies skew decisions in favor of legacy power grid investments over cleaner, often less expensive and more advanced solutions, and stand in the way of achieving deep emissions reductions and widespread consumer benefits.

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