Envisioning a clear pathway towards meeting long term greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction targets of 80% by 2050 has been a difficult and elusive task.  Yet, an exciting convergence of technology advances and success in reducing carbon emissions from electricity generation points towards viable solutions that can be implemented now to be on the right path.  It may seem counterintuitive, but the key is to rely more on decarbonized electricity to power transportation and buildings. Consider this hypothetical: if all gasoline powered cars on the road and all buildings heating with fossil fuels immediately switched to modern electric technologies like electric vehicles and high efficiency cold weather heat pumps, GHG emissions from these sources in the Northeast would be cut in half.  With further efforts to transition electricity generation to renewable resources, emissions would continue to fall.  Dramatic changes to our power grid, more decentralized and community energy approaches and redoubled efforts to maximize energy efficiency are needed to make this vision real.

  • Comments to the Draft of the 2021-2023 New Hampshire Statewide Energy Efficiency Plan

    Comments in response to the NH Electric and Natural Gas Utilities Draft of the 2021-2023 New Hampshire Statewide Energy Efficiency Plan (submitted for stakeholder review on July 1, 2020). NH Utilities made significant revisions in scope, savings, timeline, process, and program details based on the COVID-19 pandemic as well as incorporation of public and EERS (Energy Efficiency Resource Standard) Committee comments on the April 1 Draft Plan. Acadia Center’s comments are based on examination of the Draft 2021-2023 NH Plan, its analyses and reports on energy efficiency programs across the Northeast region, and conversations and deliberations within the EERS Committee.

  • Priority Climate Action Plan Strategy Recommendations

    Priority Climate Action Plan Strategy Recommendations

    This open letter to the Maine Climate Council (signed by Acadia Center and other organizations), describes the top 13 policy recommendations, pulled from every Working Group and more than 650 pages of materials, which the signatories believe are the most impactful strategies for reducing Maine's emissions.

  • The Declining Role of Natural Gas Power in New England

    This report concludes that under current plans and laws, New England’s reliance on natural gas to fuel power plants could drop from 45% to approximately 10% of its electricity needs in 2030, making any investment in new gas pipelines or plants unnecessary and therefore costly.

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