Envisioning a clear pathway towards meeting long term greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction targets of 80% by 2050 has been a difficult and elusive task.  Yet, an exciting convergence of technology advances and success in reducing carbon emissions from electricity generation points towards viable solutions that can be implemented now to be on the right path.  It may seem counterintuitive, but the key is to rely more on decarbonized electricity to power transportation and buildings. Consider this hypothetical: if all gasoline powered cars on the road and all buildings heating with fossil fuels immediately switched to modern electric technologies like electric vehicles and high efficiency cold weather heat pumps, GHG emissions from these sources in the Northeast would be cut in half.  With further efforts to transition electricity generation to renewable resources, emissions would continue to fall.  Dramatic changes to our power grid, more decentralized and community energy approaches and redoubled efforts to maximize energy efficiency are needed to make this vision real.

  • Transportation Climate Policy in Rhode Island

    Rhode Island’s transportation system—its network of highways, trains, public transit, airports, ports, and walking and biking corridors—is vital to the state’s economy. It facilitates the movement of goods and connects people to jobs, shopping, recreation, and other services. However, the system needs critical improvements to address major challenges and better serve the state’s communities and businesses.

  • Acadia Center Summary of 2018 Clean Energy Legislation in MA Page 1

    Acadia Center Summary of 2018 Clean Energy Legislation in MA

    On July 31, 2018, the Massachusetts House and Senate passed H.4857, An Act to Advance Clean Energy. On August 9, 2018, Governor Baker signed this bill into law, now Chapter 227 of the Acts of 2018. This documents summarizes the legislation and key implications.

  • Assessing New York’s Proposed ‘New Efficiency’ Initiative

    In 2018, New York released a new energy efficiency strategy that centers on a 2025 energy savings target of 185 trillion British thermal units. Acadia Center analyzed this new target and its underlying initiatives to determine whether it would maximize energy efficiency's benefits for New York. Based on that analysis, Acadia Center offers four recommendations for strengthening the plan.

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