Envisioning a clear pathway towards meeting long term greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction targets of 80% by 2050 has been a difficult and elusive task.  Yet, an exciting convergence of technology advances and success in reducing carbon emissions from electricity generation points towards viable solutions that can be implemented now to be on the right path.  It may seem counterintuitive, but the key is to rely more on decarbonized electricity to power transportation and buildings. Consider this hypothetical: if all gasoline powered cars on the road and all buildings heating with fossil fuels immediately switched to modern electric technologies like electric vehicles and high efficiency cold weather heat pumps, GHG emissions from these sources in the Northeast would be cut in half.  With further efforts to transition electricity generation to renewable resources, emissions would continue to fall.  Dramatic changes to our power grid, more decentralized and community energy approaches and redoubled efforts to maximize energy efficiency are needed to make this vision real.

  • The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative: Ten Years in Review

    This report analyzes data since the launch of the country’s first multi-state carbon reduction program. The analysis shows that CO2 emissions from power plants in the RGGI states have fallen 90% faster than in the rest of country, while economic growth in the RGGI states has outpaced the rest of the country by 31%. The program has also driven substantial reductions in harmful co-pollutants, making the region’s air cleaner and its people healthier.

  • Investing in Connecticut’s Transportation Future

    This Acadia Center analysis illustrates the benefits of a new approach for Connecticut to reduce transportation pollution while improving the system to better meet its residents’ needs. The analysis shows that, if designed well, a regional cap-and-invest policy developed through the Transportation & Climate Initiative (TCI) could enable the state to make over $2.7 billion in crucial transportation investments by 2030, which would generate over 23,000 long-term jobs and $7 billion in economic activity.

  • Testimony Supporting An Act to Protect Ratepayers in Massachusetts

    Acadia Center's testimony calls on members of the Massachusetts Telecommunications, Utilities, and Energy Committee to address regressive changes that have arisen out of recent utility rate cases and have moved the state further away from goals related to consumer control and local clean energy. In particular, this bill would correct unreasonably high returns on equity and automatic annual rate hikes at 3-4% per year. A second bill would correct another core issue: the elimination of on-peak/off-peak rates.

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